ACDP NEWS November 18, 2020




Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!


Recessed Meeting
11/18/2020 10:00 AM
ZOOM MEETING

Recessed County Commissioner’s meeting to resume today virtually (Wednesday) at 10am. Additional comments for the land development and small area plan (Option A) emailed to tory.frink@alamance-nc.com by 8am tomorrow will be read and considered. The live feed for tomorrow’s meeting will be available here: http://alamancecountync.iqm2.com/…/Detail_Meeting.aspx…

Agenda Packet


Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 17, 2020


Need Health Insurance? The ACA Marketplace Is Now Open Until Dec. 15.

Written ByKeya Vakil

Last UpdatedNovember 13, 2020 1:19 pm EST

Originally PublishedNovember 12, 2020 1:27 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKOpen enrollment through Healthcare.gov is open until Dec. 15. Image via ShutterstockOpen enrollment through Healthcare.gov is open until Dec. 15. Image via Shutterstock

While prices can get quite high for some plans, nearly 9 in 10 adults will qualify for subsidies, or financial assistance, when selecting an ACA plan.

lot has happened in the past 10 days—so much so that you may not realize that the Affordable Care Act’s open enrollment season began on Nov. 1. That’s right. If you need health insurance and can’t get it from your job, or if you lost your job and insurance during the pandemic, you can now purchase coverage for 2021 from the ACA marketplace at HealthCare.gov between now and Dec. 15. 

Fourteen states operate their own exchanges and some of them have later deadlines, but your best bet is to sign up for insurance as soon as possible, especially given the ongoing spread of the coronavirus pandemic.https://www.youtube.com/embed/KBk8Tjij7-I?feature=oembed

Here’s what you need to know about obtaining insurance under the ACA:

Depending on Your Income, You Might Qualify for No- or Low-Cost Insurance via Medicaid

Under the ACA, 36 states and Washington, DC have implemented expanded Medicaid programs, allowing millions more Americans to qualify for low- or no-cost insurance. In these states—a full list of which can be found here—the monthly pre-tax income limit to qualify for Medicaid in 2021 in the continental US will be roughly:

$1,467 for an individual

$1,982 for a family of two

$2,498 for a family of three

$3,013 for a family of four 

$3,528 for a family of five

If you live in one of the 12 states that hasn’t expanded Medicaid, or the two that have expanded but not yet implemented it—Missouri and Oklahoma—you are unlikely to qualify for the program, unless you have dependent children. Those two states will officially expand their programs in mid-2021, however. Georgia will also partially expand its program mid-year, offering coverage to low-income adults with income up to the poverty level—as Wisconsin currently does—but with an added work requirement as well. 

Other states also provide Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Plan coverage to children or parents of young children with low incomes, so in either case, it is worth checking with your state’s Medicaid agency to determine what you may qualify for. 

To determine if you qualify for Medicaid, go to HealthCare.gov, enter your state of residence and personal information, create an account, and then follow the prompts and answer questions relating to your income, household size, employment status, and more.

If You Don’t Qualify for Medicaid, You Can Buy an Insurance Plan on the ACA Exchange

More than 10 million Americans receive coverage via the ACA Marketplace, which includes a federal marketplace that 36 states use and 14 individual, state-run marketplaces. The price and quality of plans varies based on where you live, but the number of choices has increased for 2021, while average premium prices have actually remained similar or decreased in most places.

You can shop around and compare plans at Healthcare.gov, which also links out to the state-run exchanges. Plans are arranged by “metal” tiers, with platinum plans offering the best coverage and lowest deductibles (the amount you pay before your plan starts covering costs), but most expensive premiums (the amount you pay each month for your coverage). On the other end of the spectrum, bronze plans have the highest deductibles and lowest premiums, with gold and silver plans in between the two extremes. 

Different plans also have different co-pays and cost-sharing requirements, and some may limit which doctors, hospitals, and drugs you can receive coverage for. If you have specific medical needs or complicated conditions, make sure to research which plan is best for you. 

If you need ongoing medical care and treatment, say for a pre-existing condition that requires regular in-patient treatment or daily medication, a platinum or gold plan with a lower deductible may save you money over the long run, if you can afford the higher premium. On the flip side, if you’re younger or only need occasional care,—such as when you come down with the flu—a silver bronze plan might be enough for you. But if you encounter unexpected issues, such as a surgery, those lower-tier plans could leave you facing higher costs, so it’s very much a tradeoff. 

While prices can get quite high for some plans, nearly nine in 10 adults will qualify for subsidies, or financial assistance, when selecting an ACA plan. If you earn less than 400% of the federal poverty level—around $51,040 in pre-tax income for an individual or $104,800 for a family of four—you will qualify for subsidies that limit your monthly premiums for certain plans to a set percentage of your income. 

Roughly half of Americans with ACA plans also qualify for cost-sharing subsidies, that will lower your deductible and copayments if you purchase a silver tier plan and earn an income at or below 250% of the FPL, or roughly $31,900 in pre-tax income for an individual and $65,500 for a family of four.

If you’re struggling to choose a plan, which many people do given the complexity of insurance plans and labyrinth of numbers involved, you can reach out to healthcare navigators (who offer free guidance) or professional brokers (who charge a commission) in your area.

If you don’t qualify for subsidies, you can also shop for insurance plans sold directly by insurance companies, which are not listed on Healthcare.gov. But some of those plans, particularly “short-term” or “junk” insurance plans, are not required to provide the same level of benefits, standards, and protections required for marketplace plans.


TODAY!


Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!

Sign Up!


Yesterday’s Regular Meeting

Agenda Packet


Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 16, 2020





Cardinal and Pine

Every Vote Counts: NC’s Chief Justice Race is Down to the Wire

Written BySarah Ovaska

Last UpdatedNovember 14, 2020 9:58 am EST

Originally PublishedNovember 13, 2020 3:52 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKChief Justice Cheri Beasley (center) of the NC Supreme Court, with her Republican challenger Paul Newby beside her. (Photo from Beasley campaign).NC Chief Justice RaceChief Justice Cheri Beasley (center) of the NC Supreme Court, with her Republican challenger Paul Newby beside her. (Photo from Beasley campaign).

At times, the race between Cheri Beasley and Paul Newby is now separated by just 35 votes as the state tallies absentee ballots.

Note: This post has been updated to reflect Beasley’s 35-vote lead as of Saturday morning.

Readers are asking Cardinal & Pine who will be heading the state’s judiciary in January. Here’s our best answer: We don’t know.

What we do know is that every vote matters, and that the NC Supreme Court Chief Justice election this year has made that absolutely clear. 

The race between incumbent Cheri Beasley, a Democrat, and her fellow Supreme Court justice, Republican Paul Newby, is so down to the wire that the victor is still unknown on Saturday, eleven days after Election Day. And the lead has gone back and forth, almost by the hour, as elections officials continue to count and update the results.

Newby had appeared to be in the lead going into the county canvassing effort on Friday.

But by Saturday morning Beasley was again in the lead, but by just 35 votes. Several Eastern North Carolina counties—Craven, Duplin, Perquimans, Robeson, Rockingham, and Sampson—still need to canvass their remaining votes, according to Joe Bruno, a reporter with Charlotte television station WSOC . Robeson, a county that was courted heavily by both presidential candidates election and ultimately gave President Donald Trump the majority of its votes, will likely by the decider with 1,234 provisional ballots to be examined on Monday to parse out the valid ones, according to reporting from the Robesonian newspaper. About 700 of those are likely to be valid.

Beasley’s campaign thinks she’ll be able to hold on to that lead, though emphasized that a recount is likely ahead and urged North Carolinians to trust process that is to follow.

“While there is likely a longer process ahead of us, one that requires patience and faith in our election process, we are confident Chief Justice Beasley will remain the Chief Justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court in January,” her campaign manager said in a written statement Friday night.

The close races seemed to mirror what was seen across the board in the very purple state of North Carolina – close races between Democrats and Republicans, said Chris Cooper, a political scientist at Western Carolina University. The state’s 15 electoral votes, for example, will go to President Donald Trump while Roy Cooper, a Democrat, was rehired by North Carolina voters in the same election.

“Our statewide elections were pretty tight,” Cooper said. And if Beasley ultimately wins, it may be because as an incumbent she was slightly more familiar to voters. 

“If she pulls it out, it’s going to do a lot with simple incumbency and name recognition,” Cooper said 

Counting Every Vote

North Carolina is at a crucial point in its election today, with all 100 of the state’s county election boards required to finish canvassing the vote. This is the regular process that occurs in every election, when the bipartisan county boards take in all the votes cast in the course of the election—absentee (mail-in) ballots, early vote and Election Day vote—and submit the results to the state. The State Board of Elections is scheduled to meet on Nov. 24 to certify these results.

In most years, the canvass doesn’t attract much attention, given that the preliminary results on Election Day tend to give a sense of who emerged a victor in the democratic election.  

But 2020 is not like most years, as we have learned time and time again. The higher-than-normal percentage of people that opted for mail-in, or absentee, voting means that many more votes than normal came in after Nov. 3. (Those ballots had to be postmarked by Nov. 3 in order to be counted.)

Recount Likely

The election between Beasley and Newby will likely remain undecided, with a recount expected. Recounts are allowed in statewide races with a vote difference of less than 10,000 and can be requested by the candidate who is the runner-up.

Any recount requests will need to be made by Tuesday, and then county election boards would conduct recounts in public meetings.   

Most of the issues before the NC Supreme Court are not high-profile and have to do with narrow areas of state law and considering whether decisions made in county courthouses were in line with the state’s constitution. But the court has been increasingly called upon in recent years to settle disputes between the Republican-led legislature and Cooper.

They’ll also likely be tapped as well with weighing whether controversial legislative laws like redistricting and school funding formulas are in line with the state’s constitution, matters that tend to break down more on partisan lines.

Beasley, a Democrat, had been appointed to the head of the state’s judicial branch in 2019 by Gov. Roy Cooper, the latest move in a long judicial career in the state. She became the first Black woman to sit at the helm of the state’s judiciary system, following another barrier she broke through in 2008 when she became the first Black woman elected to statewide office as a member of the NC Court of Appeals.

Newby is no stranger to the high court and is the longest serving member on the NC Supreme Court having been elected to serve in 2004.

The chief justice race was significant for both parties this year. Democrats went into the 2020 election hoping to improve on their current standing, where Newby was the sole Republican on the seven-member state Supreme Court. And Republicans likewise hoped they would be able to bring conservative approaches to the court.

Even with the chief justice race still undecided, Republicans were the big winners overall in the 2020 election with Phil Berger Jr., a Republican, beating his Democrat opponent Lucy Inman. And Tamara Barringer, a Republican lawyer and former state senator, beat Democrat Mark Davis who had been appointed to the seat because of a vacancy.

The NC Court of Appeals, the appellate court below that of the Supreme Court, saw Republicans win in all five of the appellate court races. Jefferson Griffin, Jeff Carpenter, Chris Dillon, Fred Gore and April Wood will all join the 15-member appeals court in January.

That means Beasley, if she does manage to eke out a victory as all the valid votes are tallied, will be the only Democrat to emerge from statewide judicial elections this year.

Staff reporter Michael McElroy contributed to this report. 



Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!

Sign Up!


November 16 Regular Meeting

Today at 7:00pm

Agenda Packet

https://www.youtube.com/user/AlamanceCountyNC


Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 15, 2020



Truthout Op-Ed

Grassroots Organizing Defeated Trump. Now We Must Out-Organize Trumpism.

This was a historic election in so many ways: at least 148 million people voted (and counting!), which is roughly 62 percent of eligible voters. This is the highest turnout since at least 1968, and while turnout was high for both presidential candidates, Democrats won the presidency and are working to remove the most dangerous president in modern history from the White House — despite his refusal to concede. Progressives both won and lost many other races, and we saw several battleground states either pull through for Democrats, or come within a razor-thin margin. Many of these states, including Arizona, North Carolina, and Georgia, have had local and state organizers working for these victories for more than a decade.

Every single organizer I know worked on this election in some way. I am a queer, white woman from an immigrant family and I have been an organizer for almost 20 years, working exclusively in red and purple states. I witnessed the grassroots organizing behind the fight to defeat Trump as a multiracial, multigendered, intergenerational and cross-class force of people from every part of this country.

We had different strategies, different terrains and different ways we articulated this win as a priority. We owe our success to ourselves, but even more so, we owe this success to the hundreds of thousands of people in this country who were not politically active before 2016, who got involved in the last four years. We know most of them are women and so many of them are people of color. They jumped in and did all they could, learning on the go. Finally, we owe it to the millions who just went and voted: despite voter intimidation, voter suppression and an incredibly slow process. Hell, where I live in Phoenix, the right-wing had machine guns on the backs of trucks out in the streets in the past few days.

It is not rhetoric to say that it took all of us: not some shiny, polished coalition but a messy alignment of souls pointed in the same direction, united for this moment in history. We know that the right wing also has a very animated and radicalized base, convinced that the fight they are in is a war both holy and political, for the soul and the future of the nation.

Where I live there was no dancing in the streets when Biden was declared the winner. Just the silence of a city filled with enduring fighters who have won, and are bracing for the impact of backlash. Only those who have never lived in places where progressives are outnumbered make fun of the power of Trumpism.

When Trump became president in 2016, I was shocked that so many progressives were shocked. Trumpism remains a powerful threat, and that movement is built of men and women, mostly white, mostly straight, many of whom are both married and evangelical Christians. This massive reactionary force remains a threat to our very lives.We owe this success to the hundreds of thousands of people in this country who were not politically active before 2016.

The way to safety is to out-organize them. Through my work with the Women’s March, I have spent the last three years organizing with a broad base of women who are mostly brand new to activism. I can tell you that they are ready to be organized. I can tell you they busted ass for this election, leaving everything they had on the dance floor. I can tell you they are many, and they are hungry for more.

As we move forward toward out-organizing Trumpism, we must recognize some hard realities. This includes the fact that, although a multiracial coalition of mostly women drove this victory, many white women voted for Trump, without a doubt, even if you (like me) distrust exit polls.

Black and Brown women are the champions of our democracy, organizing and voting for justice for all at every turn. Meanwhile, at roughly 33 percent of the electorate, white women are just about 1 in 3 of every voter. That means it is likely that almost 50 million white women voted in this election, and a very large portion of them voted for Trump (the exact percent is based on how much you believe exit polls). Fifty million white women is an ocean of a constituency in organizing terms. It is a constituency (like any constituency) that has a spectrum of other identities and experiences of age, sexuality, class, place, ethnicity, disability, marital status and family of origin, just to name a few.It took all of us: not some shiny, polished coalition but a messy alignment of souls pointed in the same direction.

Feminist organizing is rooted in the truth that all experiences politicize you in one way or another; and in the case of white women we have many factors that can politicize us to the right, to the left, and all over the place. When it comes to white women voters, there is so much work to do. It is part of the core work of uprooting white supremacy. It is the work that people like me must do in order to live our values. It is long work, and it is in progress. The victory is also a signal to those of us called to do that work with other white women — to sit in an ocean of a constituency, and move and mobilize as many white women as possible to the side of racial justice like our lives depend on it.

Defeating Trump took all of us that showed up. Now, I have a few very old-school organizing rules, some of which fly in the face of current trends; one is that you organize whoever shows up. You don’t make them feel like they are the wrong people in the seats. You don’t only tell them about who is not there. You work with who and what you have. That is not the same as not having to tell folks about themselves sometimes, and organizing for the long game always includes being told about yourself right back. We won because of us. That does not mean we don’t have a lot of work still to do. As a teenager, I learned firsthand that safety only comes from organized networks of solidarity and care — there is no big daddy in the sky, or with a badge coming to save us. Only each other, our courage and our commitment to hold the systems that govern our lives accountable will keep us safe. That’s what my family taught me.

The work in front of us is nothing short of imagining and fashioning a new future for this country, and it is going to take all of us who are ready to come along.




November 16 Regular Meeting

Agenda Packet Public Comment Sign Up


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96






Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 14, 2020


Grassroots Organizers Flipped Georgia Blue. Here’s How They Did It.

Kelan Gilbert, 11, watches Black Voters Matter staff visit his rural Black neighborhood to speak to and support Georgia voters in Blakely, Georgia, on November 2, 2020.
Kelan Gilbert, 11, watches Black Voters Matter staff visit his rural Black neighborhood to speak to and support Georgia voters in Blakely, Georgia, on November 2, 2020.

BYAnoa ChangaTruthoutPUBLISHEDNovember 12, 2020SHAREShare via FacebookShare via TwitterShare via Email

Georgia flipping blue may have caught some people by surprise, but to those organizing on the ground for the past several years, this moment was always a possibility. As the media look for quick explanations to regain narrative control, the story of Georgia’s flip is best told through the experiences of organizers rooted in the community beyond presidential election cycles.

“This work has been going on here for years,” said Cliff Albright, co-founder of Black Voters Matter, a power-building organization focused on empowering Black civic participation. Albright pointed to the consistent organizing that has happened over the last several years that decreased the gap in the overall vote total between the two parties and reduced the margin of victory for Republicans. “That gap has been going down [with each cycle]. And then to get to this point, it was just an incredible feeling.”

National media narratives center this moment as a part of the unfinished work from Stacey Abrams’s 2018 gubernatorial campaign and battle against voter suppression. This is only part of the story. Long before Abrams ran for governor, civic engagement organizers focused on increasing voter participation and leveraging the shifting state demographics in Georgia. Building on this work, Abrams founded the New Georgia Project with the goal of organizing previously disenfranchised voters, such as the 1 million voters removed from the voter rolls between 2012 and 2018, and expanding political participation by recruiting new voters. Recent lessons from organizers point to prioritizing specific issues affecting the communities they’re reaching out to, and developing entry points into political participation.

“When I was just following campaigns in 2016 and 2018, people barely talked about immigrant rights issues,” said Aisha Yaqoob Mahmood, director of the Asian American Advocacy Fund. “They barely talked about issues that were relevant to the Asian American community.”

While she saw instances of targeted voter outreach in 2016 – for example, efforts to engage with Muslim voters — there just wasn’t enough attention to the needs of communities. As a candidate for the Georgia State House of Representatives in 2018, Mahmood experienced the power of community conversations informing campaign messaging and strategy.

Mahmood said that more than Georgia turning blue, she is energized about opportunities to move on issues important to the immigrant communities her organization represents. “We’ve got commitments from candidates, especially sheriff’s candidates around ending programs like 287(g),” said Mahmood, referring to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) program that creates partnerships between state and local law enforcement. “And [they are] really taking a look at how local communities are impacted by things like immigration enforcement.”

Candidates for sheriff promising to overturn participation in the 287(g) program won election bids in Cobb and Gwinnett counties. Groups like Mijente and SONG Power (the power-building and advocacy arm of Southerners on New Ground) built on the work of Black and Brown organizers to sever the power of pro-deportation law enforcement. Collective power-building opportunities like elections helps bring awareness to communities about potential points of advocacy.

When asked about other issues impacting immigrant communities, Mahmood highlighted the challenges facing undocumented students in the state. “If you’re undocumented in Georgia, you are not able to attend school because there’s a lot of schools that you cannot attend, but the schools that you are able to attend you have to pay out of state tuition,” said Mahmood. As conversations ramp up nationally about student loan forgiveness and the cost of higher education, Mahmood hopes people will begin to understand the additional burden placed on undocumented students and families to achieve the same educational opportunities. “We’re losing a lot of our students to other states, because it’s cheaper and easier to access than Georgia, she said.”

Another issue of focus and concern is making driver’s licenses available for undocumented people. Driving without a license coupled with increased immigration enforcement and racial profiling puts some communities in greater danger.

In addition to connecting with communities on important issues, Mahmood stressed the value of having in-language organizing from trusted sources. “We had a team of community organizers that were doing ethnic specific outreach within their church groups, or their young adult groups, to make sure that they were reaching voters who aren’t already engaged,” Mahmood said. She noted a Korean organizer who did a survey to find out people’s plans for voting and if they did not plan on voting, finding out why. Being able to have conversations like this in the language people feel most comfortable speaking enabled organizers to address why people might not vote, and address uncertainty about the process.

Similar to the Asian American Advocacy Fund, organizations like Black Voters Matter utilize opportunities for collaboration as ways of building community power. Black Voters Matter has focused on addressing bread-and-butter issues impacting individuals, and has also worked with groups such as 9to5 Georgia outside of metro-Atlanta around issues including utilities in southwest Georgia and police violence across the state. “One of the most important victories in this state isn’t the presidential, but it’s the fact that Jackie Johnson is no longer the district attorney that covers the region where Ahmaud Arbery was murdered,” said Albright.

Part of that work involved election protection and providing pathways for combating voter suppression. As a part of its coalition work in Dougherty County, Black Voters Matter along with 9to5 Georgia, the Georgia NAACP, and several other regional organizations formed an election protection coalition. Amna Farooqi, an organizer with 9to5 Georgia based in Albany, Georgia, and member of the election protection coalition, said voter turnout increased in 2018 as compared to the prior midterm cycle, but said that election also showed the need for better coordination to address election protection concerns. The group made suggestions to the Dougherty County Board of Elections about providing adequate drop boxes for absentee ballots and having more than one early voting location.

During early voting for the general election this year, Farooqi and other organizers were harassed by election officials for handing out pre-packaged snacks and water to early voters and members of the community at-large. Volunteers were told they needed to be 150 feet or more away from the polling location, relying on a provision that prevents electioneering by partisan groups, campaigns, or candidates. But the election protection team members are all a part of nonprofit nonpartisan organizations. Their presence is not considered electioneering under the current law. “We should have a deeper bench of poll workers and poll managers, and better training,” said Farooqi. “There have been a lot of complaints about poll worker training and poll managers, in terms of them not being that clear on the law.”

Farooqi said that counties must innovate and find solutions to barriers to ballot access. “Even beyond the runoff, we’re looking at a broader electoral justice package [to] find solutions around [voter suppression],” Farooqi said.

While nationally some centrist Democrats have baselessly claimed a left-leaning agenda is to blame for losing House seats, Farooqi says Georgians need to be trusted to lead in their own communities. “All of Georgia is very determined in an organizing sense,” said Farooqi. “The most progressive radical change and strategy come from people that work in rural communities and people that have been here forever.”


Stacey Abrams Discusses Georgia’s Runoff Election and Voter Turnout | The View



Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 13, 2020





Brennan Center For Justice

Mass Incarceration Has Been a Driving Force of Economic Inequality

The wealth gap has disproportionately affected Black communities for decades. Covid-19 and our criminal justice system has only made it grow.

 November 4, 2020

As people struggle with the economic fallout of Covid-19, there’s a growing sense that the economy wasn’t working well for many even before the lockdowns. In late 2019, in the middle of a theoretically strong economy, income inequality hit a record high, and a cavernous wealth gap continues to separate too many white and Black families.

Those inequalities are seen, more than anywhere else, in the criminal justice system — and more specifically in what the system does to families. 

We know that people who have been convicted of a crime or imprisoned are more likely to face poverty and other serious challenges. But our Brennan Center report calculates in dollars how criminal convictions set people up for a lifetime of diminished earnings, helping perpetuate poverty while fueling racial, health and economic inequality.

Given the sheer number of people impacted by the criminal justice system, this is not a problem we can afford to ignore — especially during a recession. Any agenda for recovery at the federal, state and local levels must also seek to reduce the economic impact of mass incarceration.

Involvement in the criminal justice system — specifically time in prison or conviction of a crime — casts a shadow over someone’s life, limiting their ability to earn a living wage in the short and long term. The effect of prison is especially pronounced: a 52% reduction in annual earnings and little earnings growth for the rest of their lives, amounting to a loss of $500,000 over several decades

Even conviction of a misdemeanor — a minor crime, such as shoplifting — can reduce earnings by 16% annually. Many people swept up in the criminal justice system already live on the edge of poverty. The reduced earning potential of a conviction can mean the difference between economic stability and inescapable poverty.

The criminal justice system affects more people, more deeply, than previously thought. More than 70 million Americans have a criminal record. Of them, nearly 8 million have been to prison. The Brennan Center study, however, is the first to calculate how many have been convicted of a misdemeanor — at least 45 million, roughly 14% of the U.S. population. 

Due to lower earnings, the total amount of money lost each year by people who have a criminal conviction or who have spent time in prison is at least $370 billion. These lost earnings could be spent on pursuing educational opportunities or buying a first home, which for many families have helped break the cycle of poverty. 

These severe consequences are inextricably bound up with the nation’s 400-year history of racial injustice. Black and Latino men and women make up more than half of all Americans who have been to prison. This disparity likely stems from decades of discriminatory policies and overpolicing of communities of color.

And while all people who have been to prison face severely reduced earnings, Black and Latino Americans are less likely than whites of the same socioeconomic group to see their earnings recover, suggesting that imprisonment traps them in low-wage jobs. White men and women who have been to prison miss out on about $270,000 over their lifetimes compared with socioeconomically similar white people who have not spent time in prison. For formerly incarcerated Black and Latino people, it’s nearly $360,000 and more than $510,000, respectively, when compared with socioeconomically similar Black and Latino people who have not been to prison.

From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96







Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 12, 2020







Incoming commissioners mum on race-related ordinances

Dean-Paul StephensTimes-News0:001:00https://imasdk.googleapis.com/js/core/bridge3.423.0_en.html#goog_271558743

Many of the Triad’s incoming county officials are choosing to remain mum about their thoughts concerning ordinances directly addressing racial strife in their respective communities.

This comes as a number of communities throughout the state have responded to the summer of protests, brought on by the extrajudicial killing of George Floyd, by formally condemning systemic racism.

“I don’t think that is something we necessarily need to do in our area,” said incoming Alamance Commissioner John Paisley, adding that the primary focus of local officials should be to bring people together after weeks of division. Paisley said he doesn’t believe ordinances focusing on racism would accomplish that.  

“First of all, I think all sides after this election need to calm down,” Paisley said. “It’s been relatively calm, since the 60s. And I don’t think we have a major racism problem in this county.”

Paisley’s sentiments come a little over a week after the town of Graham made national headlines due to local law enforcement using pepper spray against demonstrators marching to the polls. Since then, the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office has met with church leaders to discuss future best practices in regards to de-escalation methods, among other things.

Paisley alluded to the Oct. 30 march, but said it wasn’t indicative of any issues within the community.

 “But I think, particularly with outside agitation that took place prior to the election, things were stirred up tremendously mostly from outside sources,” Paisley said. “I think that’s regrettable. I think now that the election is over, outside interference will calm down or maybe even stay away. Who knows?”

Paisley went on to reiterate his belief that the Alamance community didn’t need a formal resolution condemning matters of race. Commissioners in other parts of the state disagreed.

Earlier this summer, Asheville officials made national waves when the small city announced their plans to set aside funds for a limited reparations program. 

“On July 14, Asheville City Council unanimously passed a Resolution supporting community reparations for Black Asheville,” reads an excerpt from Asheville’s website about the resolution. “The resolution acknowledges systemic racism present in the community, as well as nationally. The resolution directs the City Manager to establish a process to develop short-, medium-, and long-term recommendations to specifically address the creation of generational wealth and to boost economic mobility and opportunity in the Black community.”

In Mecklenburg County, commissioners declared racism a public health crisis, a sentiment that was echoed in Charlotte, the state’s largest city. Bladen County is the most recent to pursue language deeming racism a public health nuisance. Bladen County commissioners will vote on the resolution this coming Monday.

In Randolph County, recently elected District 5 representative Maxton McDowell echoed Paisley’s sentiments.

“For my district, I don’t think that’s a problem … in this point in time,” McDowell said.  

Both McDowell and Paisley were uncharacteristically candid, compared to other newly-elected public officials.

“Hold on, hold on, hold on,” said Alamance’s newly-elected Commissioner Pamela Thompson. “Until I am sworn in, I’m just going to wait until I am sworn in. The votes can switch and, in this day and time, I could be the last vote getter. I’m not even a commissioner until Dec. 7.”

In Davidson County, weeks after a summer of protests that lead to the removal of a Confederate monument in Lexington, newly-elected county commissioner James Shores said he needed more information before making a decision.

“I don’t actually get sworn in until the first week of December,” Shores said before saying he would be open to discussing anti-racism ordinances after reading more about them.

Newly-elected Randolph County Commissioner Kenny Kidd and newly-elected Alamance County Commissioner William Lashley Jr. could not immediately be reached for comment. 


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96






Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 11, 2020



NC Voter Turnout Was Good. But Here’s Why We Can Do Much Better.

Written ByBilly Ball

Originally PublishedNovember 6, 2020 3:57 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKST PAULS, NC - NOVEMBER 03: Sabrina Jackson waits while her dad Jack Jackson fills out a ballot at the St. Paul's National Guard Armory on Election Day on November 3, 2020 in St. Pauls, North Carolina.  After a record-breaking early voting turnout, Americans head to the polls on the last day to cast their vote for incumbent U.S. President Donald Trump or Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election. (Photo by Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images)NC Voting on Election DayST PAULS, NC – NOVEMBER 03: Sabrina Jackson waits while her dad Jack Jackson fills out a ballot at the St. Paul’s National Guard Armory on Election Day on November 3, 2020 in St. Pauls, North Carolina. After a record-breaking early voting turnout, Americans head to the polls on the last day to cast their vote for incumbent U.S. President Donald Trump or Democratic nominee Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election. (Photo by Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images)

NC reported nearly 75% turnout in 2020. But millions of North Carolinians are still not participating in our elections. 

Seventy-five percent voter turnout. Historic. Inspiring. Something, surely, to celebrate. And also, just not good enough.

North Carolinians rightly celebrated the avalanche of voters that cast ballots this election, either in-person, absentee, or via provisional ballot. Considering the circumstances of this election, in the midst of a pandemic that is as bad as it’s ever been, that turnout is staggering. It is a triumph of political organizing, a vaunted informational campaign by Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

But everything is relative. And regardless of the outcome, or the party that claims victory in the White House, the US Senate, or the NC General Assembly, we have a major problem with voting in this country and in this state.

It is not 75% of all North Carolinians who voted; it is 75% of registered voters. That 75% turnout is a percentage of the 7.3 million registered voters in North Carolina, a state with an estimated 8.2 million voting-age residents. 

With that in mind, the 5.4 million ballots cast in NC this election represents closer to 65% of North Carolinians. And most importantly, it leaves out almost 3 million who live in NC but aren’t registered to vote for whatever reason. 

Those 3 million North Carolinians matter too. 

It would be altogether stunning if NC’s turnout remains as high in the 2022 midterms or beyond. It will, barring extraordinary effort from grassroots organizers, come plummeting down in two years, even with state and federal races on the ballot with as much, if not more, impact on our lives. 

Of course we should celebrate everything that we’ve accomplished to get North Carolinians involved in this election, one that asked questions about who we are as a state and as a nation.

To the teenager in the high tops and the John Lewis t-shirt passing out voter information outside a Durham McDonald’s drive-thru on Election Day when I was just trying to buy the largest cup of coffee possible, I see you.

To Jazmyn Lee, a 19-year-old from Goldsboro who, in her first election, volunteered to stump for candidates who will address the state’s looming healthcare and education crises: I see you.

Your engagement, your energy, might change the world.  

But the task was always bigger than Trump vs. Biden, or Democrats vs. Republicans or Roy Cooper vs. the state legislature. North Carolina, nor any state, will not begin to address income inequality, restore underfunded schools, or improve upon a tortuous history of racial injustice without fostering a broader electorate, without engaging with millions of residents too tired or disinterested or busy or fed up to register and vote. 

It cannot do so without leadership that breaks down voting barriers, that disregards a phony voter fraud narrative, that spends its resources to make voting the easiest and most secure it can possibly be. 

True, NC’s voter registration, as a percentage of the voting-age population, is not the worst in the nation; nor is it the best. 

But North Carolina requires a conversation about automatic voter registration, expanded early voting, and simplified balloting procedures.

I spent nearly two hours at a Goldsboro polling site Tuesday morning. And during that time, roughly a third or more of the voters who entered found they were in the wrong precinct. The state offers an option for such voters through provisional balloting, but in a state where one-stop voting is available to all regardless of precinct during the early voting period, North Carolina can do better. 

It can do better than an absentee ballot witness requirement that voting rights experts consider ineffective or misguided. 

It can do better than a voting system that confuses even the people who cover it for a living.

It is one of our most fundamental rights as Americans. We owe it to Americans to make it as fundamentally simple as possible, regardless of party affiliation or zip code. 

There is little reason to believe that the will for such reforms exists in the NC General Assembly as it is composed. The Republican lawmakers who’ve controlled the state legislature for a decade, and figure to do so again for at least another few years, have authored voting bills driven by insincere claims about voter fraud but with the effect of making it harder to vote. 

It is true that, by conventional wisdom, an expanded electorate is a better electorate for Democrats. GOP rationale, while partisan in nature, is not faulty. 

But if I can offer one thing for the Republican leadership of the NC General Assembly, it is this: If a larger electorate is bad for your political party, then your political party is bad for the electorate. Craft a new agenda; not a new electorate.  

Speaking Thursday, two days after the polls closed in NC, civil rights leader Rev. William Barber II, who assumed control of the Poor People’s Campaign founded by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in the 1960s, seemed to recognize that what is ahead is as crucial as what lies behind.

“Nearly half the citizens in the richest nation of the world, continued to struggle to make ends meet, 140 million and growing,” Barber said. “Addressing that is the key to healing America and finishing the illusion of division and polarization.”

We cannot do that without involving that half of the citizenry, without nominating or electing candidates from that half. 

Last weekend, with NC just hours away from going to the polls, Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris made many compelling appeals to North Carolinians.

Some of it was boilerplate election speech, the kind so many of us have learned to tune out. But if there’s one thing that stuck out to me in her address Sunday in Goldsboro, in a county with a relatively high proportion of low-income voters, voters that are often the least engaged by the major political parties, it is this:

“Why are so many powerful people making it confusing and difficult to vote?” Harris asked. “I believe the answer is they know our power.” 

If you take anything from this bruising election, know that statement is profoundly true. And if they know our power, so should we.ABSENTEE VOTINGELECTION 2020ELECTION DAYNC GENERAL ASSEMBLYNORTH CAROLINAVOTER IDVOTER REGISTRATIONVOTER SUPPRESSIONVOTING


Billy Ball is the Managing Editor of Cardinal & Pine. He’s covered local, state and national politics, government, education, criminal justice, the environment and immigration in North Carolina for almost two decades, winning state, regional and national awards for his reporting and commentary. TWITTERELECTIONSAs President Trump Prepares Legal Challenges, Progressive NC Groups Demand Every Vote Is CountedCOMMENTARYRiding With Kamala Harris: Inside the Biden Campaign’s Closing Arguments in Eastern NCCRIMINAL JUSTICENew NC Research Points to Racial Bias in Soaring Life Without Parole Sentences

CORONAVIRUSPHOTOS: ‘Reopen NC’ Hits The Streets on Memorial Day. Here’s What Happened.




From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96



Message from Elaine Berry

This is a thank you. It is a thank you to ALL our brave candidates who spent months working incredibly hard to earn the right to represent the citizens of Alamance. This is also a thank you to the many volunteers who worked tirelessly in a variety of ways to support those dedicated candidates.

It is also a congratulations to the Democrats who won election: Ricky Hurtado, NC House District 63; Larry Brown, NC District Court Judge District 15A Seat 02; Katie Overby, NC District Court Judge District 15 A Seat 04; Patsy Simpson, Board of Education; Donna Davis Westbrooks, Board of Education; and Barrett Brown, Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor. We are so proud of you and happy for you.

It is also a plea for patience and for fortitude. We need to be patient and wait out the process as remaining votes are counted…and all votes should and must be counted. We also must have fortitude, especially our candidates. To run for office as a Democratic candidate in Alamance is not for the faint of heart. It is a challenge anywhere, but in Alamance County it is a 24-7 commitment where you will likely get attacked online, in person, in a newspaper, and even on signs by the roadside. Yet we ask that our candidates persist, that they learn from a loss, and they run again. And we pledge that once again we will support you whether it is with our dollars
or our time.
Forward together,
Elaine Berry





Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 10, 2020



Chase & Cure Canvass


We must reach voters, door-to-door, by Wednesday, November 11th

Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

The fight is not over, and I still need your help to cross the finish line to continue as Chief Justice. Read more about it HERE
 

We need your help today to contact voters across the state whose votes may not have been counted. We must reach voters, door-to-door, by Wednesday, November 11th. Please sign up to help us canvass in a COVID-friendly manner:

Charlotte: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/350087/ 

Durham: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356400/

Raleigh: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356389/ 

Guilford: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356404/ 

Forsyth: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356413/ 

Fayetteville: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356402/ 

Find another city near you: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/

You must participate in a mandatory virtual training prior to your shift:If you have any questions you may contact Nida Allam at nida@chiefjusticebeasley.com 


Thank an Organizer and Then Become One.

Stacey Abrams has dedicated the last two years to registering voters and fighting voter suppression to finally flip Georgia blue.

–Democrat Raphael Warnock came in first place and is now moving on to a January run-off!

–Democrat Jon Ossoff will ALSO likely advance to a January run-off!

–And Joe Biden currently is leading by over 5,000 votes.

None of these results would have without Stacey Abrams registering voters and fighting voter suppression.

Donate to support Warnock & Ossoff HERE

The Alamance perspective:

In two years, Ricky will be up for re-election and we’ll be voting on 2 new members of the Board of County Commissioners, a new sheriff, a US congressman and a new Senator. The work starts now.

Sucess story: Voting Rights Organizers Claim Victory As Biden Takes Narrow Lead In Georgia

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/07/932422815/voting-rights-organizers-claim-victory-as-biden-takes-narrow-lead-in-georgia


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96



Message from Elaine Berry

This is a thank you. It is a thank you to ALL our brave candidates who spent months working incredibly hard to earn the right to represent the citizens of Alamance. This is also a thank you to the many volunteers who worked tirelessly in a variety of ways to support those dedicated candidates.

It is also a congratulations to the Democrats who won election: Ricky Hurtado, NC House District 63; Larry Brown, NC District Court Judge District 15A Seat 02; Katie Overby, NC District Court Judge District 15 A Seat 04; Patsy Simpson, Board of Education; Donna Davis Westbrooks, Board of Education; and Barrett Brown, Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor. We are so proud of you and happy for you.

It is also a plea for patience and for fortitude. We need to be patient and wait out the process as remaining votes are counted…and all votes should and must be counted. We also must have fortitude, especially our candidates. To run for office as a Democratic candidate in Alamance is not for the faint of heart. It is a challenge anywhere, but in Alamance County it is a 24-7 commitment where you will likely get attacked online, in person, in a newspaper, and even on signs by the roadside. Yet we ask that our candidates persist, that they learn from a loss, and they run again. And we pledge that once again we will support you whether it is with our dollars
or our time.
Forward together,
Elaine Berry





Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 9, 2020



Chase & Cure Canvass


We must reach voters, door-to-door, by Wednesday, November 11th

Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

The fight is not over, and I still need your help to cross the finish line to continue as Chief Justice. Read more about it HERE
 

We need your help today to contact voters across the state whose votes may not have been counted. We must reach voters, door-to-door, by Wednesday, November 11th. Please sign up to help us canvass in a COVID-friendly manner:

Charlotte: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/350087/ 

Durham: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356400/

Raleigh: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356389/ 

Guilford: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356404/ 

Forsyth: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356413/ 

Fayetteville: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/event/356402/ 

Find another city near you: https://www.mobilize.us/nc2020victory/

You must participate in a mandatory virtual training prior to your shift:If you have any questions you may contact Nida Allam at nida@chiefjusticebeasley.com 


Thank an Organizer and Then Become One.

Stacey Abrams has dedicated the last two years to registering voters and fighting voter suppression to finally flip Georgia blue.

–Democrat Raphael Warnock came in first place and is now moving on to a January run-off!

–Democrat Jon Ossoff will ALSO likely advance to a January run-off!

–And Joe Biden currently is leading by over 5,000 votes.

None of these results would have without Stacey Abrams registering voters and fighting voter suppression.

The Alamance perspective:

In two years, Ricky will be up for re-election and we’ll be voting on 2 new members of the Board of County Commissioners, a new sheriff, a US congressman and a new Senator. The work starts now.

Sucess story: Voting Rights Organizers Claim Victory As Biden Takes Narrow Lead In Georgia

https://www.npr.org/2020/11/07/932422815/voting-rights-organizers-claim-victory-as-biden-takes-narrow-lead-in-georgia


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96



Message from Elaine Berry

This is a thank you. It is a thank you to ALL our brave candidates who spent months working incredibly hard to earn the right to represent the citizens of Alamance. This is also a thank you to the many volunteers who worked tirelessly in a variety of ways to support those dedicated candidates.

It is also a congratulations to the Democrats who won election: Ricky Hurtado, NC House District 63; Larry Brown, NC District Court Judge District 15A Seat 02; Katie Overby, NC District Court Judge District 15 A Seat 04; Patsy Simpson, Board of Education; Donna Davis Westbrooks, Board of Education; and Barrett Brown, Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor. We are so proud of you and happy for you.

It is also a plea for patience and for fortitude. We need to be patient and wait out the process as remaining votes are counted…and all votes should and must be counted. We also must have fortitude, especially our candidates. To run for office as a Democratic candidate in Alamance is not for the faint of heart. It is a challenge anywhere, but in Alamance County it is a 24-7 commitment where you will likely get attacked online, in person, in a newspaper, and even on signs by the roadside. Yet we ask that our candidates persist, that they learn from a loss, and they run again. And we pledge that once again we will support you whether it is with our dollars
or our time.
Forward together,
Elaine Berry





Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com