ACDP NEWS November 28, 2020


Push for Racial Justice in Alamance County Continues with Weekend March

Written BySarah Ovaska

Last UpdatedNovember 25, 2020 9:02 am EST

Originally PublishedNovember 24, 2020 1:50 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKThe Rev. Greg Drumwright leads a 1,000-person march to the polls on Election Day in Graham, NC. (Photo by Alvin Jacobs Jr. for Cardinal & Pine)Push for justice.The Rev. Greg Drumwright leads a 1,000-person march to the polls on Election Day in Graham, NC. (Photo by Alvin Jacobs Jr. for Cardinal & Pine)

Weeks after peaceful marchers were pepper-sprayed on the way to the polls, Black Lives Matter supporters will be back in Alamance County this Sunday. 

Pepper-spray discharged by police on a group of peaceful marchers, including children and the elderly, as they headed to the polls.

Arrests outside a routine county commissioner’s meeting after Black residents arrived to speak.

Escalated criminal charges against a civil rights leader who has spoken out against police brutality.  

This isn’t a lookback at life in the South during the Civil Rights era, but the last month of events in Alamance County, a deeply divided county between Raleigh and Greensboro with a long history of racial discrimination.  

“There is so much fear but there is so much necessity,” said Faith Cook, a Graham resident and leader of Alamance County’s People for Change.  “Something has to be done.”

She and others will be out again calling for criminal justice reform this Sunday, at a 2 p.m. protest and march leaving from Children’s Chapel United Church of Christ, 334 E. Harden St. in Graham.  The hope is to keep attention on the conflict surrounding their calls for racial equity, criminal justice reform, and the dismantling of a Confederate monument on the county courthouse step, march organizers said.

Cook was among those hit with pepper spray at an Oct. 31 march to the polls in downtown Graham on the last day of North Carolina’s early voting. The reason given by law enforcement to shut down the rally was the presence of a small gas-powered generator that was being used to amplify speakers’ voices. Rally attendees have questioned, if that was truly the only issue, why law enforcement didn’t just ask that it be removed.

By the day’s end, 23 people were arrested, including the event’s leader, the Rev. Greg Drumwright, a Greensboro pastor who grew up in the county. Drumwright has used his Justice for the Next Generation group to bring attention to the plight Black Americans face when it comes to police brutality and racial inequity.  

Cook, too, was arrested that day after she stood in line to cast her vote and then headed to the jail to support other activists. There, she used her bullhorn to start singing “We are ready for change,” but was approached by sheriff’s deputies and arrested for disorderly conduct. She sees that as another sign of the lengths law enforcement in her area will go to suppress the rights of Black residents like herself.

“Each time something happens, it enrages us, but we still go out there to engage peacefully,” Cook said. “But nothing gets done, nothing gets changed.

More Arrests, Charges

Since then, three Black Lives Matter supporters werearrested after a county commissioner’s meeting was abruptly shut down. A group had arrived to speak during the public comment portion of the meeting about the use of force by the sheriff’s office during the Oct. 31 rally.

Then Drumwright had his misdemeanor arrest charges bumped up to a felony charge of assault on an officer by the Alamance County Sheriff’s Office last week.

“I am just the latest victim of unjust and unfounded charges that seeks to funnel Black bodies, Hispanic bodies and our white allies into the criminal justice system for doing nothing else but working against racism,” Drumwright said at a press conference last Sunday, according to ABC 11.  

Sheriff Terry Johnson, when reached by Cardinal & Pine this week, said he couldn’t comment at length on the decision, other than to say that reviewing body cam and video led to the enhanced charges. 

Johnson was accused of racially profiling Latino residents by federal justice department officials under the Obama administration, although he was ultimately found not culpable by a federal judge

He said he and his agency works to respect the rights of Black and Latino residents but added that many of those coming to the rallies in Graham and his county are from outside the area.

“We work with Black and brown communities every single day,” Johnson said. 

He also said his agency is going to continue upholding the state’s laws. 

“We are going to enforce all laws here in Alamance County, that’s all I can say,” Johnson said.

[Johnson attracted attention at the start of the pandemic when he declined to issue a citation against a local speedway owner when races were held there in defiance of the governor’s executive order banning large gatherings.]

Federal Courts Now Involved

Recent events in the days leading up to the election brought national attention once again to this county, with its mix of suburban and urban.

None of this attention is likely to go away anytime soon.

Two of the nation’s premier civil rights legal organizations —the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights— filed federal lawsuits on behalf of marchers against law enforcement, saying that the disruptions and arrests on Oct. 31 amounted to voter suppression and voter intimidation.

“There are a lot of people that were hurt,” said Elizabeth Haddix, a North Carolina-based attorney with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights.

Her clients are also asking a judge to prohibit the use of pepper spray as a means of crowd control in Alamance County, in light of the protests and other community events that are likely to continue near the Confederate monument.

“They’ve been trying to talk with their elected leaders and the law enforcement agencies for a long time now,” Haddix said. “The conduct hasn’t changed.”



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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 27, 2020




Clergy say Alamance sheriff agreed Graham Confederate monument should be moved

BY CARLI BROSSEAUNOVEMBER 25, 2020 12:06 PM, UPDATED 3 HOURS 58 MINUTES

March for criminal justice reform planned in Graham

In a recent closed-door meeting, Alamance County religious leaders say Sheriff Terry Johnson gave a straightforward disavowal of white supremacy and agreed that the Confederate monument in front of Graham’s historic courthouse should be moved.

“If this is true, why aren’t you saying this in public?” Rev. Randy Orwig remembers asking Johnson at the Nov. 5 meeting attended by more than a dozen clergy.

Getting the monument moved has been a major focus of Black Lives Matter protesters, who see the statue as a symbol of a racist social order in the present as well as the past.

2015 state law forbids moving publicly owned monuments in most circumstances. One of the exceptions used to justify previous monument removals is a threat to public safety.

In Alamance County, that’s the domain of the sheriff, who is widely viewed as the center of gravity in the county’s Republican power structure in addition to the monument’s most prominent defender.

His comments to clergy are a sign that within the small town of Graham, the seat of the conservative Alamance County, political calculations are shifting. The sheriff, once accused by the U.S. Department of Justice of some of the country’s worst racial profiling, is once again in the national spotlight and under siege by lawsuits alleging he has violated people’s fundamental rights. Well-worn tactics for keeping protesters away from Graham’s Court Square have been eroding under a steady stream of legal challenges.

Johnson has not responded to multiple requests for an interview from The News & Observer.

Most recently, he has been in an escalating back-and-forth with the Rev. Greg Drumwright, a Greensboro-based pastor who led the Oct. 31 march and other demonstrations against the monument and systemic racism throughout the summer and fall.

Deputies pepper-sprayed participants in a march to the polls Oct. 31 after spotting a gas can and generator that were not allowed to be on courthouse property under the terms of an event permit. A deputy confiscated the generator, leading to a melee in which a female officer ended up on the ground. Johnson announced in the local conservative newspaper last week that he was seeking a felony charge against Drumwright for that officer’s injury.

Also last week, Johnson’s deputies arrested five people following the abrupt end of a county Board of Commissioners meeting that several protesters had attended in the hopes of making public comments about the pepper-spray incident.

And his office distributed an audio clip from a community meeting held by social justice groups that, taken out of context, seemed to suggest that Drumwright was planning a riot. It’s clear in the full recording that Drumwright was explaining that another march was necessary because it’s a constructive way to channel anger without resorting to violence.

On Sunday, as workers hung Christmas lights among the surveillance cameras overlooking Court Square, Drumwright formally announced his next large public event, “Ready 4 Change Peaceful Protest for Criminal Justice Reform,” set for Nov. 29, the Sunday after Thanksgiving.

During the press conference, Drumwright called the county’s release of his recorded comments an “attempt to foment division,” but said he stood by his words. “We are at war,” he said, echoing the audio snippet that the sheriff’s office distributed. “This has been playing out this entire summer, but it’s not located in this summer alone.” The war, Drumwright said, is the long fight against racism, and it doesn’t rely on militia tactics, chemical weapons, guns or knives.

NO PLACE FOR PROTEST

Although the cloud of pepper spray on Oct. 31 marked the only widespread use of chemical weapons in Graham in recent memory, social justice organizers in the community are familiar with displays of force.

“He’s just got a long pattern of criminalizing any kind of First Amendment freedom of expression that’s critical of him or any of his policies,” said Andrew Willis Garcés, an organizer with Siembra NC, a group that advocates for the rights of Latino people.

A march last year to protest the sheriff’s detention of immigrants in the county jail was met by officers in riot gear and a sound cannon, the Times-News reported.

At the beginning of this summer, when protesters took to the streets across the country to protest the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer, demonstrations in Graham without official sanction were effectively banned. Sheriff’s patrol cars ringed the courthouse, and police officers were told to break up groups.

federal lawsuit filed by civil rights groups has since forced Graham and Alamance County to reconsider their constraints on protest activity. That people can now protest in Graham without getting pre-approval from the police department constitutes progress, said Barrett Brown, the president of the local chapter of the NAACP who was himself arrested this summer.

Nevertheless, the Sheriff’s Office continues to remind protesters of its power. Dozens of people have been arrested on misdemeanor charges such as resisting, delaying or obstructing a law enforcement officer, and the office showed off a BearCat armored vehicle during at least two marches this summer. Deputies repeatedly appear in desert camouflage riot gear, though law enforcement best practices discourage provocative displays of military equipment.

“Showing up in riot gear communicates that you’re ready to fight,” Arizona State University professor Edward Maguire is quoted as saying in a 2018 report from the Police Executive Research Forum.

In the same report, St. Louis Metropolitan Police Chief Samuel Dotson said, “you don’t defuse a situation by having a sniper on top of a BearCat.”

THE DE-ESCALATION DILEMMA

Many questions remain about what will happen during Drumwright’s march on Sunday.

Spokesmen for the city and county said Tuesday that they hadn’t heard anything from the pastor about his plans, however, the police chief has reached out to Drumwright asking for information.

Clergy at the Nov. 5 meeting with Johnson and the Graham police chief said they implored law enforcement leaders to focus more on de-escalation.

After the meeting, the Sheriff’s Office said on its Facebook page that it would:

  • Proactively communicate with event organizers about plans
  • Review procedures for balancing the safety of participants and officers
  • Listen to feedback from the community
  • Prioritize training on de-escalation, communication and other suggested subjects
  • Participate in the Alamance County Citizen’s Public Safety Review Board

While Johnson has been meeting with select political influencers to justify the use of pepper spray on Oct. 31, he has been avoiding most reporters’ questions.

He did not allow questions at a press conference held on Nov. 2. Reporters were instructed to submit questions by email, but those have gone unanswered.

His office also has not responded to public records requests to release the videos and other material shared during his presentations nor video of the meeting with clergy as religious leaders have requested.

Other elected officials have also been quiet despite the protests being the talk of the town.

Mayor Jerry Peterman declined an interview request from The News & Observer, citing ongoing lawsuits against the city. Steve Carter, who will soon be the only county commissioner with past experience on the board, did not respond.

Amy Scott Galey, the board chair who was recently elected to the state Legislature, issued a statement via text message.

“With Guilford and Alamance counties both classified as red (critical) in Governor Cooper’s COVID-19 alert system, and with families asked to forgo traditional Thanksgiving group celebrations, it is poor timing to organize group demonstrations,” she wrote.

“While I support the First Amendment right of groups to protest, organizers should be sensitive to the immediate, legitimate, and data proven risks, which are significant,” the statement continued. “With minority communities being especially impacted by COVID-19, one would hope that event organizers would be responsible in deciding to defer group activities until the spread of the virus is under control.”

Violations of the governor’s masking order have been commonplace in Alamance County throughout the summer and fall, and top county officials have been among those flouting public health recommendations.

Commissioner Tim Sutton and County Attorney Clyde Albright have repeatedly attended indoor meetings without wearing a mask.

Johnson made headlines earlier this summer for declaring that he would not enforce the mask mandate and for a COVID-19 outbreak in the jail that infected 99 people. Inmates said they did not receive a mask until after the outbreak in August.



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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 26, 2020

Alamance County Democratic Party

Wishes you a happy and safe Thanksgiving



Commentary: Staying Home Is What the Spirit of Thanksgiving Is About in 2020

Written ByKim Mackey

Originally PublishedNovember 20, 2020 10:44 am EST SHARE TWEET LINKSpend this Thanksgiving at home.Spend this Thanksgiving at home.

NC teacher Kim Mackey talks about why Thanksgiving’s historical start means we all need to have smaller celebrations during this pandemic. 

As a high school social studies teacher I am always looking for lessons from history to offer perspective for the present. 2020 has not gone according to anyone’s plans, but the same was true for passengers on the Mayflower four hundred years ago.  

If the Wamponoag people approached the Pilgrims’ dilemma with the same “I’ll be fine—I got mine” attitude we see among some of our neighbors today, there would be no Thanksgiving. 

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, there are some teachable moments as well from the Pilgrims’ initial year-long struggle that can inform our current pandemic plight.

Stormy seas knocked the Mayflower’s course farther north than intended. Instead of continuing south to their original destination, cabin fever guided their decision to stay on the wrong course—an unfortunate sentiment mirrored by too many today.  That decision likely cost half of the passengers their lives. We’re facing our own weariness staying the course right now when it comes to COVID-19, where we are seeing the highest amount of community spread yet in the country and state. 

This past week we’ve received promising results of two COVID-19 vaccines. But just as the seasick Pilgrims didn’t jump out of the boat and swim to shore upon hearing the cry, “Land ho!” it’s important that we continue to sail prudently to ensure a safer landing with our fellow passengers. That means wearing masks, washing hands, and socially distancing when shared spaces cannot be avoided. The pandemic’s end may be in sight, but we’re not yet there and must all continue to do our part in minimizing community spread in the meantime.

Before disembarking, the Pilgrims decided it would be best to establish what is now known as the Mayflower Compact to guide their collaboration as they set off to overcome whatever unexpected challenges were ahead. It is a historical equivalent of a back-of-the envelope constitution. It reads in part:

“We… solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and one another; covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic; for our better ordering, and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.”

The early governing philosophy of our country was not “Don’t tread on me,” it was the recognition that we must “combine ourselves together…for the general good of the colony.

Doing What’s Best for the Community

Our land’s earliest inhabitants were also guided by duty to community.  Had it not been for Samoset and the Wampanoags extending a “brother’s keeper” approach to unexpected neighbors, 10 million Americans today who descend from Mayflower ancestors would not be here. If not for the Wamponoag there would be no Samuel Sturtevant (my great x10 grandfather) arriving in Plymouth around 1640—there would be no me.

For over fifty years my family’s Thanksgiving tradition has been to go bowling together, but out of respect for a necessary Thanksgiving Compact, we are not making the out-of-state trip to visit with family we’ve not seen in over a year. We’ll not venture out to a local alley, either. Instead of helping my children pick out a bright orange ball at a bowling alley that weighs as much as they did when they were born, we’ll strap on a Wii remote to bowl in the virtual world we’ve come to spend more time in than we ever anticipated. Not because it’s our first choice, but because it’s the responsible choice. 

With the support of their Native American neighbors, Pilgrims planted new seeds and adjusted to a new environment. In a few days we will celebrate the bounty of their teamwork. 

Once, like was pledged in the Mayflower Compact, we all improve on “combining ourselves together” (figuratively in this case) “for better ordering and preservation” by taking this virus seriously, we will be closer to a new version of our own generation’s Thanksgiving story.




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We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

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Burlington Times News

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All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 25, 2020



Commentary: Staying Home Is What the Spirit of Thanksgiving Is About in 2020

Written ByKim Mackey

Originally PublishedNovember 20, 2020 10:44 am EST SHARE TWEET LINKSpend this Thanksgiving at home.Spend this Thanksgiving at home.

NC teacher Kim Mackey talks about why Thanksgiving’s historical start means we all need to have smaller celebrations during this pandemic. 

As a high school social studies teacher I am always looking for lessons from history to offer perspective for the present. 2020 has not gone according to anyone’s plans, but the same was true for passengers on the Mayflower four hundred years ago.  

If the Wamponoag people approached the Pilgrims’ dilemma with the same “I’ll be fine—I got mine” attitude we see among some of our neighbors today, there would be no Thanksgiving. 

As we approach the Thanksgiving holiday, there are some teachable moments as well from the Pilgrims’ initial year-long struggle that can inform our current pandemic plight.

Stormy seas knocked the Mayflower’s course farther north than intended. Instead of continuing south to their original destination, cabin fever guided their decision to stay on the wrong course—an unfortunate sentiment mirrored by too many today.  That decision likely cost half of the passengers their lives. We’re facing our own weariness staying the course right now when it comes to COVID-19, where we are seeing the highest amount of community spread yet in the country and state. 

This past week we’ve received promising results of two COVID-19 vaccines. But just as the seasick Pilgrims didn’t jump out of the boat and swim to shore upon hearing the cry, “Land ho!” it’s important that we continue to sail prudently to ensure a safer landing with our fellow passengers. That means wearing masks, washing hands, and socially distancing when shared spaces cannot be avoided. The pandemic’s end may be in sight, but we’re not yet there and must all continue to do our part in minimizing community spread in the meantime.

Before disembarking, the Pilgrims decided it would be best to establish what is now known as the Mayflower Compact to guide their collaboration as they set off to overcome whatever unexpected challenges were ahead. It is a historical equivalent of a back-of-the envelope constitution. It reads in part:

“We… solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God, and one another; covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic; for our better ordering, and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience.”

The early governing philosophy of our country was not “Don’t tread on me,” it was the recognition that we must “combine ourselves together…for the general good of the colony.

Doing What’s Best for the Community

Our land’s earliest inhabitants were also guided by duty to community.  Had it not been for Samoset and the Wampanoags extending a “brother’s keeper” approach to unexpected neighbors, 10 million Americans today who descend from Mayflower ancestors would not be here. If not for the Wamponoag there would be no Samuel Sturtevant (my great x10 grandfather) arriving in Plymouth around 1640—there would be no me.

For over fifty years my family’s Thanksgiving tradition has been to go bowling together, but out of respect for a necessary Thanksgiving Compact, we are not making the out-of-state trip to visit with family we’ve not seen in over a year. We’ll not venture out to a local alley, either. Instead of helping my children pick out a bright orange ball at a bowling alley that weighs as much as they did when they were born, we’ll strap on a Wii remote to bowl in the virtual world we’ve come to spend more time in than we ever anticipated. Not because it’s our first choice, but because it’s the responsible choice. 

With the support of their Native American neighbors, Pilgrims planted new seeds and adjusted to a new environment. In a few days we will celebrate the bounty of their teamwork. 

Once, like was pledged in the Mayflower Compact, we all improve on “combining ourselves together” (figuratively in this case) “for better ordering and preservation” by taking this virus seriously, we will be closer to a new version of our own generation’s Thanksgiving story.




Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!



Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 24, 2020





A Push Emerges for the First Native American Interior Secretary

Representative Deb Haaland, Democrat of New Mexico, at the Capitol in January 2019.
Representative Deb Haaland, Democrat of New Mexico, at the Capitol in January 2019.Credit…Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Getty Images
Coral Davenport

By Coral Davenport

  • Nov. 20, 2020

WASHINGTON — A coalition of Democrats, Native Americans and liberal activists is urging President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. to nominate one of Congress’s first Native American women to head the Interior Department, putting an American Indian in control of vast swaths of the continent and the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The nomination of Representative Deb Haaland, Democrat of New Mexico, as Interior secretary would have undeniable symbolic power. If confirmed, a Native American for the first time would oversee 500 million acres of public lands, including national parks, oil and gas drilling sites, and endangered species habitat, and control the federal agencies most responsible for the well-being of the nation’s 1.9 million Indigenous people.

Ms Haaland and Sharice Davids of Kansas made history in 2018 as the first two Native American women elected to Congress, and Ms. Haaland would do so again as the first Native American cabinet secretary. But her lack of policy experience worries some Biden advisers, who have suggested another Native American candidate: Michael L. Connor, a deputy Interior secretary in the Obama administration, whose experience is unquestioned, even if he lacks the star power of Ms. Haaland.

Ms. Haaland is a citizen of the Laguna Pueblo, and Mr. Connor is from the Taos Pueblo, sovereign nations near Albuquerque and Taos that are among the country’s 574 federally recognized tribes.

For either candidate, a nomination would hold enormous power for Native Americans. The Interior Department has for much of the nation’s history governed federal lands and often dislodged and abused Native Americans. In 1972, about 500 Native American activists took over the department’s headquarters in Washington, protesting living standards and broken treaties.

The next Interior Secretary also will be entrusted to restore environmental protections to the millions of acres of public lands that the Trump administration has opened up to drilling, mining, logging and construction.

Historians and Native American leaders said that appointing a Native American to head the Interior Department would be a profound moment in American history.

“The Department of Interior was the driving force of modern day genocide against the Native American peoples,” said Elizabeth Kronk Warner, dean and professor of law at the University of Utah, and a citizen of the Sault Ste. Marie tribe of Chippewa Indians. “We would be moving from the shadows of perpetuated genocide to a chair at the table, from being classified as a group of people that the federal government was trying to destroy to having a president say, ‘I see you and value you to the point that I will raise you to the highest level of decision-making in the country.’”

A spokesman for the Biden transition team, Sean Savett, said that no personnel decisions regarding the Interior Department have been made. But Mr. Biden’s campaign promises included detailed proposals to improve equality for Native Americans, including a promise that “Biden will ensure tribes have a seat at the table at the highest levels of the federal government.”

Tribal and environmental activists are pushing him to follow through.

The Lakota People’s Law Action Center has launched a petition, supported by more than 120 tribal leaders, in support of Ms. Haaland.

“Like no year prior, 2020 has shown us what happens when we fail to see the importance of putting proper leaders in position to safeguard society,” the petition reads.

Michal L. Connor, a former deputy secretary at the Interior Department, during an appearance before the Senate in 2012.
Michal L. Connor, a former deputy secretary at the Interior Department, during an appearance before the Senate in 2012.Credit…Jay Mallin/ZUMA Press, via Alamy

A separate petition launched by liberal activists and signed by at least 25,000 people also calls on Mr. Biden to name a Native American Interior secretary.

Actor and environmental advocate Mark Ruffalo posted a video on Twitter with tribal leaders speaking in support of Ms. Haaland.

“It’s time for the first ever Native American to serve in the president’s cabinet to uphold tribal sovereignty and to protect our public lands as secretary of Interior,” said Brandon Yellowbird-Stevens, vice chairman of the Oneida nation, in the video.

Representative Raúl Grijalva, the Arizona Democrat who chairs the committee that oversees the Interior Department, sent a letter to Mr. Biden signed by at least 50 colleagues urging the nomination of Ms. Haaland, who has served on Mr. Grijalva’s Natural Resources Committee since her arrival in Congress last year.

“The Department of Interior was essentially set up not to take care of Indigenous people — it was set up to tear them down and disenfranchise them,” Mr. Grijalva said in an interview. “To come full circle, historically, and to put an Indigenous person in front of Interior who can do the job — you don’t often get that kind of opportunity to make history.”

Mr. Grijalva pushed back at the suggestion that Ms. Haaland was unqualified for the job.

“She’s not window dressing,” he said. “She’s competent. She’s a pro, both politically and in terms of policy, and as a member of the Resources Committee and chair of the Public Lands subcommittee she has had to endure the Trump administration’s abuse of the Interior Department.”CLIMATE FWD: What on earth is going on? Get the latest news about climate change, plus tips on how you can help.Sign Up

Ms. Haaland has made clear that she wants the job.

“It would be an honor to move the Biden-Harris climate agenda forward, help repair the government to government relationship with Tribes that the Trump Administration has ruined, and serve as the first Native American cabinet secretary in our nation’s history,” she said in a statement.

Ms. Haaland campaigned in 2018 against the Trump administration’s hard-line immigration policies and promoted Indigenous sovereignty as a “35th-generation New Mexican.” She argues that many of the issues affecting native communities — such as low-wage jobs and violence against women — afflict other groups as well.

In 2015, she became the head of the state Democratic Party and helped to flip the New Mexico state house to Democratic control.

A child of military veterans, she attended 13 public schools before graduating from high school, then started a salsa company and worked as a cake decorator before putting herself through college and law school using both food stamps and student loans.

But some people advising Mr. Biden are concerned about management at one of the federal government’s most sprawling agencies, which oversees conservation and oil and gas drilling on public lands and off the nation’s coastline; a vast network of dams and reservoirs across the West; the Fish and Wildlife Service, a major federal science agency; the U.S. Geological Survey; and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Bureau of Indian Education and the Bureau of Trust Funds Administration, which manages the financial assets of American Indians held in trust.

They also worry that the confirmation of Ms. Haaland to a cabinet post would temporarily diminish Democrats’ already narrow majority in the House — until a special election could be held in her Democratic district.

Those people back the appointment of Mr. Connor.

In an emailed statement, Mr. Connor wrote, “It would be an honor to serve in the Biden-Harris Administration and carry out the important work necessary to address the country’s most pressing challenges.”

Mr. Connor worked in the agency throughout the Clinton administration, including four years as director of the Secretary’s Indian Water Rights Office, managing negotiations between tribes and the federal government on water issues. He later worked for former Senator Jeff Bingaman, Democrat of New Mexico, on land, water, energy and Native American issues before returning to Interior during the Obama administration, where he became the first Native American to hold the No. 2 post.

“It’s more about who has the qualifications than who is the public face,” said Sianna Lieb, a progressive activist who co-launched the petition urging Mr. Biden to name a Native American as Interior secretary. “Having been in the Interior Department is a good start — the qualifications are knowing how to run the department.”


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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 23, 2020


Recommended Reads:

Heather Cox Richardson on FaceBook & Twitter

Heather Cox Richardsonis a political historian who uses facts and history to make observations about contemporary American politics. She posts new essays daily. Her new book is How the South Won the Civil War: Oligarchy, Democracy, and the Continuing Fight for the Soul of America.

November 21, 2020 (Saturday)

We are faced with the odd prospect of a president fighting desperately to keep a job he evidently doesn’t want. Trump has continued to insist he did not lose the 2020 election, and yet seems to have given up on governing. He has not taken any questions from reporters since Election Day and has spent a great deal of time golfing. Today the G20, the “Group of Twenty,” consisting of the leaders of developed or developing countries from around the world, met virtually. After speaking briefly, Trump turned his attention back to tweeting false information about the 2020 election. Then, while members of the G20 began to talk about responses to the global pandemic, Trump went golfing. This was his 298th golf trip during his presidency. Today America surpassed 12 million coronavirus infections. While the president golfs, President-Elect Joe Biden is trying to pressure Congress to pass another coronavirus bill as the economy lurches toward another drop. Incoming presidents usually want to hold their influence in reserve to take credit for new policies, but Biden is pushing forward because he is so concerned about the economy. Unless Congress passes a new bill, about 12 million Americans will lose their unemployment benefits at the end of the year. Hunger and homelessness will follow.The image of a political leader insisting he deserves a crucial leadership role he has little interest in filling echoes South Carolina Senator James Henry Hammond in 1858. Hammond stood up on the floor of the Senate in the midst of the sectional crisis and told his colleagues he had not studied the issue that was tearing the nation apart, but felt able to vote on it anyway. He would simply vote as his southern friends did, he said, because they were leaders and he trusted them to have done the work he hadn’t. In any case, it didn’t matter much what anyone said, according to Hammond, because the Constitution had limited the government so it could do nothing but protect property. Even if an overwhelming majority of Americans wanted the government to do something more expansive, it could not.Hammond went on to explain that men like him and the other white slave holders who directed the Democratic Party in his era belonged at the top of society. They were naturally supported by the masses, whom he called “mudsills” after the timbers driven into the ground to support the plantation homes above. “In all social systems there must be a class to do the menial duties, to perform the drudgery of life,” he explained. Those people were dumb and unskilled, but they were strong and loyal. So long as their betters directed them, the mudsills would labor effectively, producing capital which moved upward and permitted “that other class which leads progress, civilization, and refinement,” to move the country forward. Elsewhere, Hammond made his principles clear: “I repudiate, as ridiculously absurd, that much-lauded but nowhere accredited dogma of Mr. Jefferson, that “all men are born equal.” In his mind, Hammond belonged in the Senate because he was a member of the ruling class.The following year, aspiring politician Abraham Lincoln answered Hammond with the vision that would become the intellectual underpinning of the newly formed Republican Party. Lincoln rejected the idea that society moved forward thanks to the efforts of a few rich men. He denied that most people belonged to a lower, menial class into which they were, as he said, “fatally fixed” for life. Instead, Lincoln argued that, if properly organized, society progressed thanks to the hard work and innovation of ordinary men. While rich men had no incentive to think up new ideas, he said, ordinary Americans worked and innovated so they could provide for themselves. As they did, they made more money than they and their families needed, so they would use the surplus to buy goods that would support merchants, shoemakers, and so on. In turn, those people would work hard and accumulate capital, which in turn would support a few financiers and industrialists, who would use their own accumulated capital to hire men just starting out, and the cycle would begin again. The heart of the system was not wealthy men, but hardworking ordinary ones.Central to this system was government’s guarantee that all men were equal before the law and that all men had equal access to resources. This meant that the government must not protect the very wealthy. It would require a government that did more than protect property; it must keep the economic playing field between wealthy men and ordinary men level.These two versions of America appear, once again, to be on the table.





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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 22, 2020




We Don’t Know Who Won the Top Slot at the NC Supreme Court This Election. That’s Normal.

Written ByMichael McElroy

Originally PublishedNovember 20, 2020 3:53 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKFILE - In this Sept. 3, 2020, file photo, a worker prepares tabulators for the upcoming election at the Wake County Board of Elections in Raleigh, N.C. Early in-person voting starts Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, in all 100 counties in North Carolina, where the historically popular form of casting ballots has been upstaged this fall by people voting by mail during the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, file)Election 2020-North Carolina VotingFILE – In this Sept. 3, 2020, file photo, a worker prepares tabulators for the upcoming election at the Wake County Board of Elections in Raleigh, N.C. Early in-person voting starts Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, in all 100 counties in North Carolina, where the historically popular form of casting ballots has been upstaged this fall by people voting by mail during the COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, file)

North Carolina is slated to certify election results Tuesday, three weeks after Election Day part of the normal process every election.

Seventeen days after Election Day and a few days before North Carolina’s votes are certified, the race for chief justice of the NC Supreme Court is nearly — but not quite — almost over.

The incredibly tight race, with just 400 votes separating the two, is in the midst of a statewide recount. 

But, this is not a sign of delay or a sluggish process. Everything is on schedule, election officials say, in a deliberate process built to protect the very votes they are counting.

Chief Justice Race Remains Extraordinarily Close 

At last count, Justice Paul Newby, a Republican, led incumbent Cheri Beasley, a Democrat, by 409 votes in a judicial election with more than 5.4 million ballots cast. That air-thin margin falls well within the 10,000-vote threshold for a recount, and Beasley has requested one. 

That recount is ongoing at all 100 counties so that one final count and a winner can be declared. (You can monitor the recount results here.)

As close as the race is, it will be difficult for Beasley to make up the difference. Of the 100 counties, in NC, 11 had completed their recounts as of 3:15 p.m. Newby lost a net 3 votes among those counties, and Beasley gained a net of zero. 

The recount will be finished by Wednesday and the North Carolina State Board of Elections will certify the rest of its results on Tuesday, Nov. 24. 

Election Process Went Smoothly Despite 2020 Challenges

This close race and the detailed procedure for marshaling it highlight a glaring national contradiction.

Despite President Donald Trump’s bleats to the contrary, the 2020 general election was a smooth display of law, statute and civic duty conducted by elections officials who followed the process, corrected standard human error and ensured, often ballot by ballot, that every vote counted. 

It was an historic election across the country. Joe Biden won more votes than any candidate in history, and Trump won more votes than any other losing incumbent in history. North Carolina also set several records, often by a wide margin. The state saw more than 5.5 million total votes cast; better than 75% voter-participation rates; surging absentee ballots; record new registrations  – all during a pandemic, a hamstrung post office, and fears of international interference. 

On Thursday they announced that “all 100 county boards of election recently completed hand-to-eye audits,” a standard procedure and “an important step in confirming accurate election results.” The calendar has long been set in law and all, or most all, has gone according to plan.

What may seem like stilted, boring procedure, is really the poetry of democracy. 

“Pursuant to state law, the bipartisan county boards conduct a hand-to-eye audit of ballots from randomly selected voting groups,” the NCBOE said in a news release.

“The audit is a comparison of the machine counts of ballots with hand-to-eye counts to ensure voting equipment recorded voters’ choices accurately.” 

Translation: Each vote is vital, this is serious business, and state elections officials will do what it takes to get it right.

The audit included more than 150 Election Day precincts and 30 early voting sites, the board said. Only 13 audits found discrepancies between the voting machines and the hand count, and none of them were more than three votes, officials said  Most differences were attributed to human error,  including voters who marked outside the ballot bubbles or election officials who made errors in the hand count. 

The process worked, said Karen Brinson Bell, executive director of the NCBOE.

“This successful audit is a testament to our elections officials,” she said in the news release. “North Carolinians can be confident that their votes count.”



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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 21, 2020




The New York Times

Why Charges Against Protesters Are Being Dismissed by the Thousands

Prosecutors declined to pursue many of the cases because they concluded the protesters were exercising their basic civil rights.

Kentucky state troopers dressed in riot gear took protesters who were violating curfew in Louisville, Ky., into custody in June.
Kentucky state troopers dressed in riot gear took protesters who were violating curfew in Louisville, Ky., into custody in June.Credit…Luke Sharrett for The New York Times
Neil MacFarquhar

By Neil MacFarquhar

Nov. 19, 2020LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Matt Kaufmann loved bringing real-world issues into his classroom, but he never expected he would become a lesson himself. The headlines, however, made it hard to avoid: “Kentucky High School Teacher of the Year Arrested,” blared the local news after he was detained on May 31.

An English teacher at Marion C. Moore School at that time, Mr. Kaufmann was among more than 800 people swept up by the police in Louisville during the many months of demonstrations prompted by the police killings of George Floyd in Minneapolis and Breonna Taylor in Louisville.

Mr. Kaufmann and his fiancée, protest novices, joined a large downtown crowd in late May, he said, when police officers began to break up the demonstration by firing tear gas and charging from all sides. With a helicopter thumping overhead, he suddenly found himself lined up on the ground with dozens of other protesters, then hauled off to a crowded jail cell.

“I had never experienced anything like that before,” Mr. Kaufmann, 41, said. “It was scary.”

Now, more than five months later, as Mr. Kaufmann’s case and those of thousands of others finally land in courts across the United States, a vast majority of cases against protesters are being dismissed. Only cases involving more substantial charges like property destruction or other violence remain.

Matt Kaufmann, an English teacher in Louisville, Ky., with two of his students, Kaelyn Goatley, left, and Onastajia Meiman. He was arrested while at a social justice protest.
Matt Kaufmann, an English teacher in Louisville, Ky., with two of his students, Kaelyn Goatley, left, and Onastajia Meiman. He was arrested while at a social justice protest.Credit…Xavier Burrell for The New York Times

Prosecutors called the scale of both the mass arrests and mass dismissals within a few short months unrivaled, at least since the civil rights protests of the early 1960s. With the police detaining hundreds of people in major cities, the arrests this year ended up colliding with the limitations of the court system.

In the aftermath, prosecutors declined to pursue many of the cases because they concluded that the protesters were exercising their basic civil rights. Cases involving free speech or free assembly rarely succeed in court, according to prosecutors across the country, and the coronavirus pandemic also played a role in the decision. A wave of thousands of minor cases threatened to capsize courts already floundering under hefty lockdown backlogs.

There was also the recognition that law enforcement officers often use mass arrests as a technique to help clear the streets, not to confront illegal behavior.

For those handling the cases, the task has felt Sisyphean. “Every day I would think I was done and the next morning there would be 50 or 100 cases to tally,” said Mary Ellen Heng, a deputy city attorney for Minneapolis. So far the city is pursuing about 75 of 666 cases.

“What’s happened in the last few months here is nothing like I have seen in my 23 years when it comes to the volume of cases,” she said.

Most charges in the almost 300 federal protest cases involve arson or assaulting police officers, as do the state and municipal cases.

“This is the hangover from months of protests,” said Ted Shouse, a criminal defense attorney in Louisville who helped to organize more than 100 volunteer defense attorneys.

Protest leaders and defense attorneys nationwide accuse the police of piling on charges to try to halt the demonstrations. “It was to squelch dissent,” said Attica Scott, the only Black woman in the Kentucky State Legislature and one of the protest organizers detained by the police.

The arrest of Ms. Scott in September has become one of the most contentious cases in Louisville because she and several other protest leaders were initially accused of trying to ignite a library, a felony, and of violating a 9 p.m. curfew.

The Jefferson County attorney, Mike O’Connell, appeared in court himself to ask that the felony charges be dropped after reviewing the evidence, including a live Instagram broadcast by Ms. Scott with a time stamp showing that the arrests came before curfew.

State Representative Attica Scott of Kentucky hugging fellow protesters after her felony charges were dismissed in October.
State Representative Attica Scott of Kentucky hugging fellow protesters after her felony charges were dismissed in October.Credit…Xavier Burrell for The New York Times

Defense attorneys working on cases in numerous cities said more people of color than white people were charged, but it was not a universal pattern. “Even adjusting for the racial makeup of the protests, Black people have been charged out of proportion,” Mr. Shouse in Louisville said.RACE/RELATED: A deep and provocative exploration of race, identity and society with New York Times journalists.Sign Up

A recent study by The Louisville Courier-Journal found that Black people constituted 53 percent of those arrested there during the four months starting May 29, but that they faced 69 percent of the felony charges. In Portland, Ore., which is predominantly white, white defendants constituted 65 percent of the more than 140 cases moving forward, while 32 percent were from other racial groups.

Sgt. John Bradley, a spokesman for the Louisville Metro Police Department, said that officers made arrests on the basis of Kentucky law, and that it was up to the county attorney whether to prosecute.

Precise numbers on both arrests and dismissals nationwide are elusive amid the complicated patchwork of law enforcement agencies and the state, county or city prosecutors involved.

In Los Angeles County, for example, the district attorney declined to file criminal charges against 334 people but is pursuing 257 cases of people arrested between the end of May and the beginning of August, said Greg Risling, a spokesman.

But not all jurisdictions in Los Angeles County are dismissing cases. Beverly Hills is pursuing misdemeanor charges against a group of 25 people stemming from one protest in June and plans to pursue others from another protest in July, said Rachel Steinback, the coordinator for the National Lawyers Guild of Los Angeles’s Mass Defense Committee.

In Portland, the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office boiled its numbers down into a neat chart: District Attorney Mike Schmidt has rejected 721 cases, is pursuing 144 and has 165 under review.

Based on the example of Occupy Wall Street protesters a decade ago, Mr. Schmidt knew that judges would toss out most cases or impose small sentences. “Seventy to 80 percent would not survive constitutional challenges,” said Mr. Schmidt, who added that the costs far outweighed any benefit to public safety.

Adding 1,000 cases to the yearly average of under 20,000 would be daunting, he said. The same is true for the Minneapolis city attorney, whose office handles some 15,000 misdemeanors annually. “Even if Covid was not a problem, it would be a monstrous task for us to prosecute 500 additional cases,” Ms. Heng said.

Lawyers representing clients who had been arrested during protests in Louisville prepared to discuss the dismissal of cases.
Lawyers representing clients who had been arrested during protests in Louisville prepared to discuss the dismissal of cases.Credit…Xavier Burrell for The New York Times

Walk into virtually any large courthouse in America and the strain of dealing with the case backlog is palpable.

In Louisville, those cases are referred to as being in the “parking lot.” There are some 22,000 such cases over all, with just four of 10 trial courts functioning in the Jefferson County Courthouse. Across two days in late October, 300 protest case arraignments were jammed onto the calendar, about 10 times the normal rate.

Judge Lisa Langford briefly lost track of which cases were in the courtroom and which were on Zoom. “He has been waving at me, I thought he was just happy to see me,” she joked after locating a lawyer on Zoom.

Prosecutors have moved to dismiss 219 protest cases, said Josh Abner, the spokesman for the Jefferson County attorney.

“We don’t have a magic wand that we can wave in connection with all these cases,” said Mr. O’Connell, noting that a team of four prosecutors was combing through them.

After mass arrests during the 2000 Republican National Convention, Philadelphia legislated a lesser charge to get people off the streets. Police officers started issuing summonses outside regular courts. Misdemeanors and felonies go to the district attorney, while summonses do not.

Larry Krasner, the city’s district attorney, said that his office was reviewing 586 cases and that the city was dropping up to 2,000 summonses. Cases being reviewed involve incidents like breaking into stores or torching police vehicles.

Prosecutions there and elsewhere were also curtailed by the chaotic nature of the demonstrations, especially during the first few weeks when most arrests occurred. With the police working double shifts, paperwork lagged, so finding reports or witnesses for some cases proved impossible.

Protesters marching for justice for Breonna Taylor clashed with the police in May. 
Protesters marching for justice for Breonna Taylor clashed with the police in May. Credit…Whitney Curtis for The New York Times

In Louisville, as the months drag on with the charges dangling overhead, many protesters feel stuck in limbo.

Kelly Parry, 33, both a volunteer defense attorney and a defendant, was among some 76 protesters arrested while blocking an avenue in July. “It is mentally draining not knowing what might happen to you,” she said. “You are constantly thinking, ‘Is this a small situation or will it become something bigger?’”

Mr. Kaufmann, the teacher, was charged with a curfew violation, a misdemeanor, but tried to ignore it. “I don’t want to give in to fear,” he said, focusing instead on his new job within the Jefferson County school system that involves helping to develop a social justice curriculum.

He and Stephanie Kornexl-Kaufmann, then his fiancée and now his wife, decided to join the protesters after hearing the recording of the 911 call that Kenneth Walker, Ms. Taylor’s boyfriend, made as the police broke into her apartment during a botched drug raid.

“We were dumbfounded, we were shocked,” Mr. Kaufmann said. “The country does not live up to the values that we have been teaching in class.”

Mr. Kaufmann had been named the state’s high school teacher of the year partly for building classroom discussions around real-world issues like the #MeToo movement. But none had hit quite so close to home.

News of his arrest spread at lightning speed.

“Even adjusting for the racial makeup of the protests, Black people have been charged out of proportion,” said Ted Shouse, a criminal defense attorney in Louisville.
“Even adjusting for the racial makeup of the protests, Black people have been charged out of proportion,” said Ted Shouse, a criminal defense attorney in Louisville.Credit…Xavier Burrell for The New York Times

Kaelyn Goatley, 17, a senior at Marion C. Moore School, had to explain to her grandmother, who was initially appalled, why Mr. Kaufmann’s arrest was a good thing.

“I was proud that I had a teacher who was out on the streets fighting for justice,” she said. “He has this big title being high school teacher of the year and the fact that he was out there protesting and being arrested meant that he risked that. It shows how adamant he is about making change.”

In late October, Mr. Kaufmann learned that the charges against him, his wife and a former student who was with them would be dropped. He was elated but noted that hundreds of cases were still pending.

“My young Black male and female friends who I met through the protests were in greater danger than I was and some of them are still dealing with these charges,” he said. “It is not fair, it is not consistent and we have to do better.”

Neil MacFarquhar is a national correspondent. Previously, as Moscow bureau chief, he was on the team awarded the 2017 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting. He spent more than 15 years reporting from around the Mideast, including five as Cairo bureau chief, and wrote two books about the region. @NeilMacFarquhar


Food Drop off for Alamance County Health Department

Today! 10 AM EST – 4 PM EST

Alamance County Democratic Party Headquarters, 122 N. Main St., Burlington

Alamance County Democratic Women will be collecting canned goods for the COVID food pantry at the Alamance Health Department. Daily deliveries are made to quarantined families who aren’t able to get food. These items in the pantry are running low and they could use help with the following:

· Canned fruit
· Rice
· Beans (canned or dry)

Shelf stable microwave meals (such as Hormel Compleats)

· Crackers
· Canned pasta sauce
· Macaroni & Cheese

Gift cards to Food Lion or Walmart are also welcomed.


Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!



Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 20, 2020




With NC Setting Dangerous COVID Highs, Cooper Says Local Governments Must Act

Written BySarah Ovaska

Originally PublishedNovember 17, 2020 5:19 pm EST SHARE TWEET LINKGov. Roy Cooper urged local governments in some communities to consider new coronavirus restrictions as the virus spreads. (Image via NC DPS)Gov. Roy CooperGov. Roy Cooper urged local governments in some communities to consider new coronavirus restrictions as the virus spreads. (Image via NC DPS)

State officials tout new county alert system that pinpoints counties in need of local coronavirus restrictions. 

North Carolina is breaking records when it comes to COVID-19, and in a dangerous way.

More hospital beds were used to care for those with COVID-19 than ever before, with 1,501 people sick enough to need around-the-clock medical care. Tuesday saw the second-highest number of people to test positive in a single day, with 3,288 reports of new positive tests.  The death toll from COVID-19 in North Carolina stood Tuesday at 4,852 but will continue to climb.

“These are numbers we cannot ignore,” said NC Gov. Roy Cooper at a press conference Tuesday, noting the entire state is seeing widespread transmission of the disease.  He introduced a new county alert system, that will indicate when an area has a critical number of cases and ability to deal with the aftermath.

Those figures and statistics are proof the infectious disease is very much out there in the public, and spreading silently among family gatherings, casual get-togethers, church services and workplaces, said NC Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Mandy Cohen. The strain on hospitals is of particular concern, she said, with areas like the Triad seeing a jump in hospitalizations.

“We are already seeing some of our hospitals realize some strain,” Cohen said.

In light of that, Cooper again encouraged people across the state to forego the large Thanksgiving gatherings they typically might attend. He dropped the indoor gatherings limit to 10 people from 25 earlier this month.He also wants to see more local counties and communities act with localized restrictions.  

“Your communities may benefit or suffer from your decision,” Cooper said.

Cohen suggested that if people are gathering, have those Thanksgiving dinners outside, with everyone wearing masks and getting tested ahead of time.

NC released its new county-level assessment of COVID-19 cases, highlighting those areas with the most significant spread (Source: NC Governor’s Office)

Counties on Alert

Cooper also revealed a new county COVID alert report that highlights those areas of the state that are seeing the worst of the virus, and said the NC Department of Health and Human Services would work with them to make additional suggestions for localized restrictions.  

The measure looks at new cases over the last two weeks per 100,000 people, as well as percent of positive tests and the capacity of local hospitals to handle any surge in cases.

There are ten, mostly rural, counties considered in critical shape now:  Alexander, Avery, Columbus, Davie, Gaston, Hoke, Mitchell, Sampson, Wilkes and Wilson counties.

These are some suggested actions for counties with the highest levels of COVID-19 concentration:

·  Limiting socialization with other households

·  Businesses encourage employees to telework

·  Cancel non-essential work travel

·  Avoiding indoor meetings above 10 people

·  Expand access to free testing events

·  Increase local authorities’ enforcement of gather limits or mask requirements

·  Adopt local ordinances with civil penalties

If counties in trouble don’t take serious steps to slow the spread of COVID-19, then Cooper said he would consider taking action.

“We may have to do more, either on a statewide level or at the local level, in some way,” Cooper said. “That decision has not yet been made, but we’re hoping that this effort can help us slow the spread.”  

Hope for a Vaccine

The pleas for better compliance with public health recommendations came amid major breakthroughs in vaccine development, with two vaccine candidates showing promise they’ll be incredibly effective at protecting people from this new strain of coronavirus. 

Pfizer announced last week that its vaccine candidate appears to be 90% effective in a large-scale trial of the vaccine. Then Moderna came in with equally good news, its potential candidate is testing at 94.5% effectiveness. (To put that in perspective, the flu vaccine each year has an efficacy between 40 and 60%, while two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine are 97% effective according to CDC data.)

Both, if granted emergency use by the FDA, could be available as early as mid-December to front-line and healthcare workers. Average Americans likely won’t have access until later in 2021.

A new study released today indicated that immunity to the disease could last years, or even decades.

These are all good things, Cooper said, but what remains in front of North Carolinians is a dangerous uptick in the disease right now, when there are no vaccines and no cures available.

“We cannot let weariness win,” Cooper said.


Food Drop off for Alamance County Health Department

SATURDAY, Nov 21 AT 10 AM EST – 4 PM EST

Alamance County Democratic Party Headquarters, 122 N. Main St., Burlington

· Crackers
· Canned pasta sauce
· Macaroni & Cheese
. Shelf stable microwave meals (such as Hormel Compleats)Gift cards to Food Lion or Walmart are also welcomed.

Alamance County Democratic Women will be collecting canned goods for the COVID food pantry at the Alamance Health Department. Daily deliveries are made to quarantined families who aren’t able to get food. These items in the pantry are running low and they could use help with the following:
· Canned soups
· Ramen
· Canned fruit
· Rice
· Beans (canned or dry)


Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!



Burlington Times News

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From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com


ACDP NEWS November 19, 2020




Volunteer in Georgia for the Senate Runoff Elections!

Sign Up!

We have the opportunity to flip the Senate blue if we win both of Georgia’s Senate runoff races.

Sign up to volunteer with Georgia Democrats and help elect Reverend Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff and take back the Senate!

What’s a Runoff, and Why Are There Two? Here’s Why Georgia Matters

Neither of Georgia’s Republican senators drew a majority on Election Day, sending both of their races to special rematches in January that will likely determine control of the Senate.

Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, is headed to a runoff election after Senator David Perdue fell short of a majority he needed to win re-election.
Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, is headed to a runoff election after Senator David Perdue fell short of a majority he needed to win re-election.Credit…Nicole Craine for The New York Times

By Luke Broadwater

  • Published Nov. 7, 2020Updated Nov. 11, 2020

As the dust settles from the presidential race, the eyes of the political world have already shifted to Georgia, where two runoff elections set for early January will almost certainly determine which party has control of the Senate.

The outcome of the contests, which will play out two weeks before President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s inauguration, will either swing the majority to Democrats, handing the new president broad power to carry out his policy agenda and push through nominations as he sees fit, or leave Republicans in charge, allowing them to influence his plans.

In the weeks ahead, tens of millions of dollars in campaign cash are expected to pour into the state to fund a marathon of political advertising, while party leaders and interest groups on both sides train their attention on the races.

Here’s how it will work.

A runoff election is essentially a rematch that is held when none of the candidates meet the criteria for winning. Under Georgia law, candidates must receive a majority of the vote to win an election. If no candidate breaks 50 percent, the top two vote-getters then face off again in a runoff election to determine the winner.

Georgia’s runoff law was created in the 1960s as a way to preserve white political power in a majority-white state and diminish the influence of Black politicians who could more easily win in a multicandidate race with a plurality of the vote, according to an Interior Department report.

Since the 1990s, Democrats have won only one of seven statewide runoffs in general or special elections, according to Inside Elections, the nonpartisan political newsletter.

While Senate elections are staggered so that a state’s two seats are not up for re-election at the same time, this was an unusual year for Georgia.

Senator David Perdue, a Republican, was facing a normal re-election race for the seat he won in 2014. In addition, Senator Kelly Loeffler, another Republican appointed last year to succeed Senator Johnny Isakson after he retired because of health issues, was facing a special election to serve out the remainder of his term until 2022.

Both of their races went to runoffs because neither they nor their challengers garnered at least 50 percent of the vote.

After a prolonged count that ended on Friday night, Mr. Perdue fell just short of the majority he would have needed to win re-election against Jon Ossoff, a Democrat, sending both of them to a runoff. In 2017, Mr. Ossoff lost in a runoff election for seat in the House.

It has been clear since Tuesday that Ms. Loeffler’s race would be decided in a runoff, after the Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, and Ms. Loeffler emerged as the top two finishers in a crowded field competing to replace Mr. Isakson.ON POLITICS WITH LISA LERER: A guiding hand through the political news cycle, telling you what you really need to know.Sign Up

Georgia’s law says the runoffs are to take place on the Tuesday of the ninth week after the election. That puts them on Jan. 5. Voters must be registered to participate by Dec. 7.

The state will hold three weeks of early voting. Registered voters may vote by mail if they request an absentee ballot.

The Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, is entering a runoff in January for the Senate seat held by Kelly Loeffler.
The Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock, a Democrat, is entering a runoff in January for the Senate seat held by Kelly Loeffler.Credit…Lynsey Weatherspoon for The New York Times

It is traditionally more difficult for candidates to convince voters to turn out for elections that do not feature the presidential contest on the ballot, and this special election will come shortly after New Year’s with the country still in the middle of the coronavirus pandemic.

In the past, Democrats have struggled in such races, with Republicans dominating the format in conservative-learning Georgia.

But both parties are expected to dump ample resources into turning out their voters for the runoffs, and since there are no other races happening around the country, enormous national attention will be focused on Georgia.

The stakes will be high. Republicans hold a 53-to-47 majority, but after elections this week, they were tied 48 to 48 with Democrats. While Senate races in Alaska and North Carolina have yet to be called, Republicans are expected to prevail in those states, which would put the party in control of 50 seats.

If Republican leads in those states hold, Democrats would need to capture both of the seats in Georgia to secure a 50-50 tie in the Senate. Then, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris could cast tiebreaking votes to carry out the Democratic agenda. If they were to lose one, Republicans would maintain their majority, albeit by the slimmest of margins.

With judicial nominees, a stimulus deal, infrastructure and health care measures, and tax and spending policies all on the line, the Senate races in Georgia are likely to take on an intensity that mirrors the presidential race that just ended.

And with President Trump refusing to concede and making baseless accusations that the election was stolen from him, Republicans are likely to try to use their grievances about the presidential race to galvanize their voters to turn out in Georgia and deny Mr. Biden the Senate he would need to get things done.


Recessed Meeting
11/18/2020 10:00 AM
ZOOM MEETING

Recessed County Commissioner’s meeting took place Wednesday at 10am. Additional comments for the land development and small area plan (Option A) emailed to tory.frink@alamance-nc.com by 8am tomorrow will be read and considered. The live feed for tomorrow’s meeting will be available here: http://alamancecountync.iqm2.com/…/Detail_Meeting.aspx…

Agenda Packet


Burlington Times News

Give us your take on the news. Write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@thetimesnews.com.

All letters must be between 300-350 words. Letters containing foul language, falsehoods and hate speech will not be considered for publication.


From Dayson Pasión:

Alamance Burlington Equity Advisory Council

I told you I’m not waiting to get elected to do the work of creating a more equitable public education system for our students and families. Something that I talked about and proposed during the campaign is the formation of an equity advisory council that is community-led and would make recommendations to district leadership. So let’s get to work. It’s going to take all of us.

Use this link to sign up for more information: https://forms.gle/ufWJTj1xuXu5sdg96


Change is Coming to Alamance.

Be Part of It!

Contact : chair@alamancedemocraticparty.com